Toyota eyes mass robots for cars and home helpers

 

Production line robots: the origin of a robot army?

 

From The Age:

Robots in the home … will need to perceive the world around them, respond to commands, and think, plan and take action on their own … Toyota has the means to apply the same scale it has used to make Corolla compact cars affordable in bringing down the cost of robots.

“It is extraordinary that a very wide segment of society can afford cars,” Pratt says. “Cars are everywhere. I see no reason that robots couldn’t be everywhere as well.”

Source: Toyota eyes mass robots for cars and home helpers

Augmented humans blend technology and biology with apps for the brain and embeddable devices

From the ABC:

Self-described “human cyborg” Neil Harbisson. Image source: Facebook

“… So you go to your phone today, and you go ‘ok what can I add to my phone that will give me some functionality?’. You’ll be able to do that for your brain,” he said.

“Maybe I’ll download a Chinese language pack, maybe you’ll add a whole set of data, maybe Wikipedia put inside your brain and download it, so you will have access to it when you’re thinking.

“That’s artificial intelligence, but embedded and accessed through your brain.”

Source: Augmented humans blend technology and biology with apps for the brain and embeddable devices – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Australian startup creates world’s first AI-powered business advisor

From Forbes:

Image: BriN

 

… would you take serious business advice from an AI-powered “consultant”?

 

Image: BRiN

Source: BRiN. From face recognition to virtual personal assistants and robots, AI has seen huge advancements and unprecedented applications in the past few years – thanks to recent significant developments in algorithm-based deep learning. But while it’s more common to accept that a machine could help you with a mundane task, would […]

Source: An Australian Startup Creates The World’s First AI-Powered Business Advisor – Forbes

Robot that ‘remembers and learns’ could be scrapped after escaping lab for second time

Hmmm. For real?!?

 

From the Mirror:

They say that despite reprogramming it twice, the robot continues to attempt to escape and they are now considering scrapping it. The other robots which have been created from the same series are well-behaved, and have not been escaping, say the team.

Source: Intelligent robot that ‘remembers and learns’ could be scrapped after escaping a lab for a second time – Mirror Online

Ethical question leaves potential buyers torn over self-driving cars

From The Guardian:

A self-driving Lexus SUV, operated by Google, after colliding with a public bus in Mountain View, California, in February 2016. Photograph: AP

A self-driving Lexus SUV, operated by Google, after colliding with a public bus in Mountain View, California, in February 2016. Photograph: AP

Faced with two deadly options the public want driverless vehicles to crash rather than hurt pedestrians – unless the vehicle in question is theirs …

The problem seems to be how to get people to trust cars to consistently do the right thing if we’re not even sure we want them to do what we think is the right thing.

Read full article: Ethical question leaves potential buyers torn over self-driving cars, study says | Technology | The Guardian

 

Related post: http://www.robopocalypse.com.au/2016/06/30/self-driving-cars-are-going-to-save-a-lot-of-lives-by-killing-their-driver/

Death by GPS: are satnavs changing our brains?

From The Guardian:

Illustration: Nishant Choksi

Illustration: Nishant Choksi

The soothing voice of the turn-by-turn directions, guiding us through an unfamiliar environment, is the personification of the strip map. Allegiance to that strip map promotes the reasoning that lies behind the most baffling death-by-GPS scenarios, the willingness to “turn right here” when “here” is clearly a lake …

“The problem with GPS systems is, in my eyes, that we are not forced to remember or process the information. As it is permanently ‘at hand’, we need not think or decide ourselves …”

Source: Death by GPS: are satnavs changing our brains? | Technology | The Guardian

Real dog meets robot dog

 

Dogs know. Dogs ALWAYS know. You must always listen to your dog!

 

From The Guardian:

Source: Top dog: watch what happens when a real canine meets a robo-pooch | Technology | The Guardian

Alphabet unveils robot dog capable of cleaning the house

 

It can climb stairs, go around obstacles and pick itself up if it falls over. Behold the first iteration of the Terminator!

 

From The Guardian:

SpotMini is the quietest and smallest Boston Dynamics robot yet, designed to navigate within the tight confines of a home and able to shimmy under tables and pick up objects with its articulated arm …

 

Photograph: Boston Dynamics

Photograph: Boston Dynamics

Source: Alphabet unveils robot dog capable of cleaning the house | Technology | The Guardian

Self-driving cars are going to save a lot of lives … by killing their driver

From The Next Web:

Credit: Ezume Images/Shutterstock

 

Giving programmers the ability to control the outcome in a crash is a heavy burden that needs to be better understood before implementing code that could kill innocent pedestrians, the car’s driver, or all of the above.

 

casualties-self-driving-car

Source: Self-driving cars are going to save a lot of lives… by killing their driver

 

Related post: http://www.robopocalypse.com.au/2016/06/30/ethical-question-leaves-potential-buyers-torn-over-self-driving-cars/

Biohackers: letting technology get under their skin

From Brisbane Times:

Biohackers with Northstar devices freshly installed in their hands. Photo: Grindhouse Wetware / Ryan O’Shea

For some people, the human body isn’t a temple. Instead they see it as a source of frustration thanks to the considerable limitations compared to the powerful technology available today …

… the most advanced example has to be what is now called neurohacking, which involves modifying the brain or nervous system. In 2002, I had a “BrainGate” device implanted in the nerves in my arm to enable me to control a robot hand via the internet using my thoughts. It also gave me an extra, ultrasonic sense, so that as an object came closer to me the electronic pulses stimulating my brain increased in frequency.

Source: Meet the biohackers letting technology get under their skin